productivity

Heat, human performance and occupational health -- a review and assessment of global climate change impacts

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Briggs D, Freyberg C, Lemke B, Otto M, Hyatt O
Year: 
2016

Ambient heat exposure is a well-known health hazard, which reduces human performance and work capacity at heat levels already common in tropical and subtropical areas. Various health problems have been reported. Increasing heat exposure during the hottest seasons of each year is a key feature of global climate change. Heat exhaustion and reduced human performance are often overlooked in climate change health impact analysis. Later this century, many among the four billion people who live in hot areas worldwide will experience significantly reduced work capacity owing to climate change.

Time-motion analysis as a novel approach for evaluating the impact of environmental heat exposure on labor loss in agriculture workers

Authors: 
Ioannou LG, Tsoutsoubi L, Samoutis G, Kajfez Bogataj L, Kenny GP, Nybo L, Kjellstrom T, Flouris AD
Year: 
2017

Introduction: In this study we (i) introduced time-motion analysis for assessing the impact of workplace heat on the work shift time spent doing labor (WTL) of grape-picking workers, (ii) examined whether seasonal environmental differences can influence their WTL, and (iii) investigated whether their WTL can be assessed by monitoring productivity or the vineyard manager's estimate of WTL. Methods: Seven grape-picking workers were assessed during the summer and/or autumn via video throughout four work shifts.

Estimated work ability in warm outdoor environments depends on the chose heat stress assessment metric

Authors: 
Peter Bröde, Dusan Fiala, Bruno Lemke, Tord Kjellstrom
Year: 
2018

With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively.

Impact of climate change on occupational health and productivity: a systematic literature review focusing on workplace heat

Authors: 
Levi M, Kjellstrom T, Baldasseroni A
Year: 
2018

Background: With climate change, mean annual air temperatures are getting hotter and extreme weather events will become more and more common in most parts of the world. Objectives: As part of the EU funded project HEAT-SHIELD we conducted a systematic review to summarize the epidemiological evidence of the effects of global warming-related heat exposure on workers’ health and productivity.

Heat, Human Performance, and Occupational Health: A Key Issue for the Assessment of Global Climate Change Impacts

Authors: 
Tord Kjellstrom, David Briggs, Chris Freyberg, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, Olivia Hyatt
Year: 
2016

Ambient heat exposure is a well-known health hazard, which reduces human performance and work capacity at heat levels already common in tropical and subtropical areas. Various health problems have been reported. Increasing heat exposure during the hottest seasons of each year is a key feature of global climate change. Heat exhaustion and reduced human performance are often overlooked in climate change health impact analysis. Later this century, many among the four billion people who live in hot areas worldwide will experience significantly reduced work capacity owing to climate change. In

Climate Change and Labour: Impacts of Heat in the Workplace

Authors: 
Matthew McKinnon, Elise Buckle, Kamal Gueye, Isaiah Toroitich, Dina Ionesca, Eva Mach, Marina Maiero. TECHNICAL AUTHORS: Tord Kjellstrom, Matthias Otto, Bruno Lemke, Olivia Hyatt, Dave Briggs, Chris Freyberg, Lauren Lines
Year: 
2016

Developed in collaboration with the ILO, the International Organization for Migration, UNI Global Union, the International Trade Union Confederation, the International Organization of Employers, and ACT Alliance, and together with the Climate Vulnerable Forum and the support of the the World Health Organisation, this report looks at the impact of rising temperatures due to climate change on the workforce.

Workplace heat stress, health and productivity – an increasing challenge for low and middle income countries during climate change.

Authors: 
Tord Kjellstrom, Ingvar Holmer, Bruno Lemke
Year: 
2009

Background: Global climate change is already increasing the average temperature and direct heat exposure in many places around the world. Objectives: To assess the potential impact on occupational health and work capacity for people exposed at work to increasing heat due to climate change. Design: A brief review of basic thermal physiology mechanisms, occupational heat exposure guidelines and heat exposure changes in selected cities.