climate change

Rural mental health impacts of climate change

All Authors: 
Berry HL, Kelly BJ, Hanigan IC, Coates JH, McMichael AJ, Welsh JA, Kjellstrom T.
Publication Date: 
2008

This paper considers how climate change may affect rural Australian mental health. Rural Australians live with various systematic disadvantages and many feel marginalised; climate change, especially drought, has worsened this. With drier conditions and more severe droughts expected in much of southern and eastern Australia over coming decades, and the demands for change and adaptation that this will present, we urgently need to understand the likely consequences for the mental health and wellbeing of people in rural Australia. Existing knowledge can guide us through understanding

Climate change, heat exposure and labour productivity.

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T
Publication Date: 
2000

“Too hot” working environments are not just a question of “comfort”, but a real concern for health protection and ability to perform work tasks. For un-acclimatized persons, already at temperatures above 22.5 degrees C the ability to perform at full capacity is reduced, and for acclimatized persons this reduction starts at 26 degrees C (WBGT). The reduction in work ability can be considered a form of “disability” that should be taken into account when assessing the “burden of disease or ill health” caused by global warming.

The direct impact of climate change on regional labour productivity

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Kovats S, Lloyd SJ, Holt T, Tol RSJ.
Publication Date: 
2009

Global climate change will increase outdoor and indoor heat loads, and may impair health and productivity for millions of working people. This study applies physiological evidence about effects of heat, climate guidelines for safe work environments, climate modeling, and global distributions of working populations to estimate the impact of 2 climate scenarios on future labor productivity. In most regions, climate change will decrease labor productivity, under the simple assumption of no specific adaptation.

Climate Change and Health -- impacts, vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation.

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Weaver HJ.
Publication Date: 
2009

Global climate change is progressing and health impacts have been observed in a number of countries, including Australia. The main health impacts will be due to direct heat exposure, extreme weather, air pollution, reduced local food production, food- and vectorborne infectious diseases and mental stress. The issue is one of major public health importance. Adaptation to reduce the effects of climate change involves many different sectors to minimise negative health outcomes. Wide-scale mitigation is also required, in order to reduce the effects of climate change.

Regional maps of occupational heat exposure: past, present and potential future

All Authors: 
Hyatt O, Lemke B, Kjellstrom T.
Publication Date: 
2010

Background: An important feature of climate change is increasing human heat exposure in workplaces without cooling systems in tropical and subtropical countries. Detailed gridded heat exposure maps will provide essential information for public health authorities. Objectives: To develop and test methods for calculating occupational heat exposures and present results in easily interpreted maps.

Invited editorial: climate change impacts on working people: how to develop prevention policies

All Authors: 
Nilsson M, Kjellstrom T.
Publication Date: 
2018

The evidence on negative consequences from climate change on human health and well-being is growing (1–5). The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) described climate change as a threat to the climate system that sets the basis for life and human health conditions (6). The changing climate is expected to affect basic requirements needed to support and sustain human health such as good food, clean water, and unpolluted air, with negative effects that are expected to be unequally distributed.

Climate change and mental health: a causal pathways framework

All Authors: 
Berry HL, Bowen K, Kjellstrom T
Publication Date: 
2010

Objectives Climate change will bring more frequent, long lasting and severe adverse weather events and these changes will affect mental health. We propose an explanatory framework to enhance consideration of how these effects may operate and to encourage debate about this important aspect of the health impacts of climate change. Methods Literature review. Results

Public health impact of global heating due to climate change – potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Butler A-J, Lucas R, Bonita R.
Publication Date: 
2010

Objectives Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Method We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. Results

Climate change, workplace heat exposure and occupational health in Central America.

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Crowe J.
Publication Date: 
2011

Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks.

Climate change, occupational health and workplace productivity.

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Publication Date: 
2011

Climate change will increase the average global temperature, but there will be substantial variation in local regions. A variety of potential health impacts have been identified. One issue of emerging concern is high heat exposure in workplaces, both indoors and outdoors. This is already a major problem for people with physically demanding work in places with very hot seasons each year. Heat stress creates physiological change, clinical health effects and lowered work capacity, which for some people reduces their hourly productivity and income. The economic