climate

Impact of climate conditions on occupational health and related economic losses: a new feature of global and urban health in the context of climate change.

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Publication Date: 
2016

One feature of climate change is the increasing heat exposure in many workplaces where efficient cooling systems cannot be applied. Excessive heat exposure is a particular problem for working people because of the internal heat production when muscle work is carried out. The physiological basis for severe heat stroke, other clinical effects, and heat exhaustion is well known. One feature of this health effect of excessive workplace heat exposure is reduced work capacity, and new research has started to quantify this effect in the context of climate change.

Climate conditions, workplace heat and occupational health in South-East Asia in the context of climate change

All Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Lemke B, Otto M
Publication Date: 
2017

Occupational health is particularly affected by high heat exposures in workplaces, which will be an increasing problem as climate change progresses. People working in jobs of moderate or heavy work intensity in hot environments are at particular risk, owing to exposure to high environmental heat and internal heat production. This heat needs to be released to protect health, and such release is difficult or impossible at high temperatures and high air humidity. A range of clinical health effects can occur, and the heat-related physical

Impact of climate and air pollution on acute coronary syndromes: an update from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2017.

All Authors: 
Kaluzna-Oleksy M, Aunan K, Rao-Skirbekk S, Kjellstrom T, Ezekowitz JA, Agewall S, Atar D
Publication Date: 
2018

NO ABSTRACT. THIS IS THE FIRST FEW PARAGRAPHS During the recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2017 several papers reported data on air pollution and ambient temperature in relation to myocardial infarction (MI). Environmental stressors have an unquestionable influence on cardiac health. In fact, global climate change may lead to a variety of negative effects on health, including increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Towards action on social determinants for health equity in urban settings (the KNUS report)

All Authors: 
T Kjellstrom, S Mercado
Publication Date: 
2008

More than half of the global population now live in urban settings. Urbanization can and should be beneficial for health. In general, nations with high life expectancies and low infant mortality rates are those where city governments address the key social determinants of health.