Climate CHIP Publications

Associations between urbanisation and components of the health-risk transition in Thailand. A descriptive study of 87,000 Thai adults

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Weaver H
Year: 
2009

Background: Social and environmental changes have accompanied the ongoing rapid urbanisation in a number of countries during recent decades. Understanding of its role in the health-risk transition is important for health policy development at national and local level. Thailand is one country facing many of the health challenges of urbanisation. Objective: To identify potential associations between individual migration between rural and urban areas and exposure to specific social, economic, environmental and behavioural health determinants.

The direct impact of climate change on regional labour productivity

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Kovats S, Lloyd SJ, Holt T, Tol RSJ.
Year: 
2009

Global climate change will increase outdoor and indoor heat loads, and may impair health and productivity for millions of working people. This study applies physiological evidence about effects of heat, climate guidelines for safe work environments, climate modeling, and global distributions of working populations to estimate the impact of 2 climate scenarios on future labor productivity. In most regions, climate change will decrease labor productivity, under the simple assumption of no specific adaptation.

Book Chapter - Global situation concerning work-related injuries and diseases.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T and Hogstedt C In: Elgstrand K and Pettersson I. Eds.
Year: 
2009

the official picture Work related injuries and diseases come in many different forms and are often difficult to record, because other causal or risk factors than work are also involved. A worker injured by machinery inside a factory will clearly be classified as an occupational injury, but what if the worker was injured in a car crash driving between two worksites during working hours? It is likely that this will be classified as a traffic injury rather than as an occupational injury. Similarly, if an insulation worker who smokes develops lung cancer or

Book Chapter - Air pollution interacts with Climate Change – consequences for human health

Authors: 
Pershagen G, Kjellstrom T, Bellander T. (2009) . In: Pleijel H Ed.
Year: 
2009

Air pollution and climate change are often treated as if they were two separate problems, when they actually represent the same scourge. While the former has the most acute impact on human health, and causes economic harm to buildings, vegetation and activities such as tourism, the latter affects lives, property and the natural world in a less direct way, through weather disasters, windstroms, floods, droughts and rising sea levels.

Workplace heat stress, health and productivity – an increasing challenge for low and middle income countries during climate change.

Authors: 
Tord Kjellstrom, Ingvar Holmer, Bruno Lemke
Year: 
2009

Background: Global climate change is already increasing the average temperature and direct heat exposure in many places around the world. Objectives: To assess the potential impact on occupational health and work capacity for people exposed at work to increasing heat due to climate change. Design: A brief review of basic thermal physiology mechanisms, occupational heat exposure guidelines and heat exposure changes in selected cities.

Global climate change and health -- a new theme for research in environmental medicine.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2009

Foreword This report is the result of an assignment that the Swedish Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM) gave Professor Tord Kjellstrom towards the end of 2008. The task was to assemble in a broad manner the knowledge available concerning health effects of the global climate change and the research questions that are of importance for future research in Sweden concerning these health effects. The report is part of the Institute´s efforts to develop a strategy for its engagement regarding

Climate change and health: impacts, vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Weaver HJ
Year: 
2009

Global climate change is progressing and health impacts have been observed in a number of countries, including Australia. The main health impacts will be due to direct heat exposure, extreme weather, air pollution, reduced local food production, food- and vectorborne infectious diseases and mental stress. The issue is one of major public health importance. Adaptation to reduce the effects of climate change involves many different sectors to minimise negative health outcomes. Wide-scale mitigation is also required, in order to reduce the effects of climate change.