Climate CHIP Publications

Estimated work ability in warm outdoor environments depends on the chose heat stress assessment metric

Authors: 
Peter Bröde, Dusan Fiala, Bruno Lemke, Tord Kjellstrom
Year: 
2018

With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively.

Estimating population heat exposure and impacts on working people in conjunction with climate change

Authors: 
Tord Kjellstrom, Chris Freyberg, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, David Briggs
Year: 
2018

Increased environmental heat levels as a result of climate change present a major challenge to the health, wellbeing and sustainability of human communities in already hot parts of this planet. This challenge has many facets from direct clinical health effects of daily heat exposure to indirect effects related to poor air quality, poor access to safe drinking water, poor access to nutritious and safe food and inadequate protection from disease vectors and environmental toxic chemicals. The increasing environmental heat is a threat to environmental sustainability.

Estimating population heat exposure and impacts on working people in conjunction with climate change

Authors: 
Tord Kjellstrom, Chris Freyberg, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, David Briggs
Year: 
2018

Increased environmental heat levels as a result of climate change present a major challenge to the health, wellbeing and sustainability of human communities in already hot parts of this planet. This challenge has many facets from direct clinical health effects of daily heat exposure to indirect effects related to poor air quality, poor access to safe drinking water, poor access to nutritious and safe food and inadequate protection from disease vectors and environmental toxic chemicals. The increasing environmental heat is a threat to environmental sustainability.

Extreme Heat and Migration

Authors: 
Mariam Traore Chazalnoël, Eva Mach, Dina Ionesco, Tord Kjellstrom, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, David Briggs, Kerstin Zander, James Goodman, Lucy Fiske
Year: 
2017

The impacts of climate change on global temperatures profoundly affect people’s ability to sustain their livelihoods as well as their health; both of these dimensions in turn influence the migration of people. Indeed, increasing heat related to climate change is likely to result in more disruptive events, such as frequent droughts, wildfires, episodes of extreme temperatures and heat waves. Such events are already directly and indirectly displacing large numbers of people each year and likely to lead to the migration of more people in the future.

Climate conditions, workplace heat and occupational health in South-East Asia in the context of climate change

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Lemke B, Otto M
Year: 
2017

Occupational health is particularly affected by high heat exposures in workplaces, which will be an increasing problem as climate change progresses. People working in jobs of moderate or heavy work intensity in hot environments are at particular risk, owing to exposure to high environmental heat and internal heat production. This heat needs to be released to protect health, and such release is difficult or impossible at high temperatures and high air humidity. A range of clinical health effects can occur, and the heat-related physical

Extreme Heat and Migration

Authors: 
Mariam Traore Chazalnoël, Eva Mach, Dina Ionesco, Tord Kjellstrom, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, David Briggs, Kerstin Zander, James Goodman, Lucy Fiske
Year: 
2017

The impacts of climate change on global temperatures profoundly affect people’s ability to sustain their livelihoods as well as their health; both of these dimensions in turn influence the migration of people. Indeed, increasing heat related to climate change is likely to result in more disruptive events, such as frequent droughts, wildfires, episodes of extreme temperatures and heat waves. Such events are already directly and indirectly displacing large numbers of people each year and likely to lead to the migration of more people in the future.

Climate conditions, workplace heat and occupational health in South-East Asia in the context of climate change

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Lemke B, Otto M
Year: 
2017

Occupational health is particularly affected by high heat exposures in workplaces, which will be an increasing problem as climate change progresses. People working in jobs of moderate or heavy work intensity in hot environments are at particular risk, owing to exposure to high environmental heat and internal heat production. This heat needs to be released to protect health, and such release is difficult or impossible at high temperatures and high air humidity. A range of clinical health effects can occur, and the heat-related physical

Global heating: Attention is not enough; We need acute and appropriate actions.

Authors: 
Nybo L, Kjellstrom T, Kajfez Bogataj L, Flouris AD
Year: 
2017

Introducing HEAT-SHIELD ambitions for inter-sectoral collaboration to tackle temperature issues related to workplace heat “Welcome to the world of Temperature!” With these words the present journal was launched as a publication with special focus on temperature issues and their essential importance for life.1 Romanovsky AA. New research journals are needed and can compete with titans. Temperature. 2014;1(1):1-5. doi:10.4161/temp.27666.

Recruitment, Methods, and Descriptive Results of a Physiologic Assessment of Latino Farmworkers: The California Heat Illness Prevention Study

Authors: 
Mitchell DC, Castro J, Armitage TL, Vega-Arroyo AJ, Moyce SC, Tancredi DJ, Bennett DH, Jones JH, Kjellstrom T, Schenker MB
Year: 
2017

Objective: The California heat illness prevention study (CHIPS) devised methodology and collected physiological data to assess heat related illness (HRI) risk in Latino farmworkers. Methods: Bilingual researchers monitored HRI across a workshift, recording core temperature, work rate (metabolic equivalents [METs]), and heart rate at minute intervals. Hydration status was assessed by changes in weight and blood osmolality. Personal data loggers and a weather station measured exposure to heat. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to collect demographic and occupational information.