heat

The direct impact of climate change on regional labour productivity

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Kovats S, Lloyd SJ, Holt T, Tol RSJ.
Year: 
2009

Global climate change will increase outdoor and indoor heat loads, and may impair health and productivity for millions of working people. This study applies physiological evidence about effects of heat, climate guidelines for safe work environments, climate modeling, and global distributions of working populations to estimate the impact of 2 climate scenarios on future labor productivity. In most regions, climate change will decrease labor productivity, under the simple assumption of no specific adaptation.

Heat impact on school children in Cameroon, Africa: potential health threat from climate change

Authors: 
Dapi LN, Rocklov J, Nguefack-Tsague G, Tetanye E, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

Background: Health impacts related to climate change are potentially an increasing problem in Cameroon, especially during hot seasons when there are no means for protective and adaptive actions. Objective: To describe environmental conditions in schools and to evaluate the impact of heat on schoolchildren's health during school days in the Cameroon cities of Yaoundé and Douala. Methods: Schoolchildren (N=285) aged 12–16 years from public secondary schools completed a questionnaire about their background, general symptoms, and hot feelings in a cross-sectional study.

Climate change, workplace heat exposure and occupational health in Central America.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Crowe J.
Year: 
2011

Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks.

Climate change, occupational health and workplace productivity.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2011

Climate change will increase the average global temperature, but there will be substantial variation in local regions. A variety of potential health impacts have been identified. One issue of emerging concern is high heat exposure in workplaces, both indoors and outdoors. This is already a major problem for people with physically demanding work in places with very hot seasons each year. Heat stress creates physiological change, clinical health effects and lowered work capacity, which for some people reduces their hourly productivity and income. The economic

Association between heat stress and occupational injury among Thai workers: findings of the Thai Cohort Study

Authors: 
Tawatsupa B, Yiengprugsawan V, Kjellstrom T, Berecki-Gisolf J, Sebsman SA, Sleigh A
Year: 
2013

Global warming will increase heat stress at home and at work. Few studies have addressed the health consequences in tropical low and middle income settings such as Thailand. We report on the association between heat stress and workplace injury among workers enrolled in the large national Thai Cohort Study in 2005 (N=58,495).

Current and future heat stress in Nicaraguan work places under a changing climate.

Authors: 
Sheffield PE, Herrera JGR, Lemke B, Kjellstrom T, Romero LEB
Year: 
2013

While climate change continues to increase ambient temperatures, the resulting heat stress exposure to workers in non-climate controlled settings is not well characterized, particularly in low and middle income countries. This preliminary report describes current heat stress in Nicaraguan work places and estimates occupational heat stress in 2050. From over 400 measurements of heat exposure using wet bulb globe temperature, more than 10% of all measurements exceeded the safety threshold for the combination of light work and rest at the ratio of 25:75.

Occupational heat effects: a global health and economic threat due to climate change.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Lucas R, Lemke B, Sahu S, In Butler C (Ed),
Year: 
2014

This chapter discusses the role of climate change in increasing workplace heat exposures and the association of human physiology and performance with ambient heat exposure. The clinical effects of heat exposure as well as its economic and well-being impacts are described. Preventive actions are suggested.

Impact of climate conditions on occupational health and related economic losses: a new feature of global and urban health in the context of climate change.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2016

One feature of climate change is the increasing heat exposure in many workplaces where efficient cooling systems cannot be applied. Excessive heat exposure is a particular problem for working people because of the internal heat production when muscle work is carried out. The physiological basis for severe heat stroke, other clinical effects, and heat exhaustion is well known. One feature of this health effect of excessive workplace heat exposure is reduced work capacity, and new research has started to quantify this effect in the context of climate change.

Recruitment, Methods, and Descriptive Results of a Physiologic Assessment of Latino Farmworkers: The California Heat Illness Prevention Study

Authors: 
Mitchell DC, Castro J, Armitage TL, Vega-Arroyo AJ, Moyce SC, Tancredi DJ, Bennett DH, Jones JH, Kjellstrom T, Schenker MB
Year: 
2017

Objective: The California heat illness prevention study (CHIPS) devised methodology and collected physiological data to assess heat related illness (HRI) risk in Latino farmworkers. Methods: Bilingual researchers monitored HRI across a workshift, recording core temperature, work rate (metabolic equivalents [METs]), and heart rate at minute intervals. Hydration status was assessed by changes in weight and blood osmolality. Personal data loggers and a weather station measured exposure to heat. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to collect demographic and occupational information.

The last Summer Olympics? Climate change, health, and work outdoors

Authors: 
Kirk R Smith, Alistair Woodward, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, Cindy J Chang, Anna A Mance, John Balmes, Tord Kjellstrom
Year: 
2016

Climate change threatens human health in many ways, through heat waves, extreme weather events, and shifts in disease vectors, as well as economic and social stresses on populations living in or trying to escape areas affected by seawater intrusion, drought, lower agricultural productivity, and floods. 1 In the short term, most of these impacts could be substantially ameliorated by actions to reduce background disease risks and other known causes of vulnerability.