Climate CHIP Publications

Climate change, occupational health and workplace productivity.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2011

Climate change will increase the average global temperature, but there will be substantial variation in local regions. A variety of potential health impacts have been identified. One issue of emerging concern is high heat exposure in workplaces, both indoors and outdoors. This is already a major problem for people with physically demanding work in places with very hot seasons each year. Heat stress creates physiological change, clinical health effects and lowered work capacity, which for some people reduces their hourly productivity and income. The economic

Climate change, workplace heat exposure and occupational health in Central America.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Crowe J.
Year: 
2011

Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks.

Climate change and mental health: a causal pathways framework

Authors: 
Berry HL, Bowen K, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2010

Objectives Climate change will bring more frequent, long lasting and severe adverse weather events and these changes will affect mental health. We propose an explanatory framework to enhance consideration of how these effects may operate and to encourage debate about this important aspect of the health impacts of climate change. Methods Literature review. Results

Climate change impacts on working people: how to develop prevention policies

Authors: 
Nilsson M, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

The evidence on negative consequences from climate change on human health and well-being is growing. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) described climate change as a threat to the climate system that sets the basis for life and human health conditions. The changing climate is expected to affect basic requirements needed to support and sustain human health such as good food, clean water, and unpolluted air, with negative effects that are expected to be unequally distributed.

The association between overall health, psychological stress and occupational heat stress among a large national cohort of 40,913 Thai workers.

Authors: 
Tawatsupa B, Lim L, Kjellstrom T, Seubsman S, Sleigh A, Thai Cohort Study Team
Year: 
2010

Occupational heat stress is a well-known problem, particularly in tropical countries, affecting workers, health and well-being. There are very few recent studies that have reported on the effect of heat stress on mental health, or overall health in workers, although socioeconomic development and rapid urbanization in tropical developing countries like Thailand create working conditions in which heat stress is likely. This study is aimed at identifying the relationship between self-reported heat stress and psychological distress, and overall health status in Thai workers.