Climate CHIP Publications

Sustainability challenges from climate change and air conditioning use in urban areas

Authors: 
Lundgren K, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2013

Global climate change increases heat loads in urban areas causing health and productivity risks for millions of people. Inhabitants in tropical and subtropical urban areas are at especial risk due to high population density, already high temperatures, and temperature increases due to climate change. Air conditioning is growing rapidly, especially in South and South-East Asia due to income growth and the need to protect from high heat exposures.

Calculating workplace WBGT from meteorological data

Authors: 
Lemke B, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2012

The WBGT heat stress index has been well tested under a variety of climatic conditions and quantitative links have been established between WBGT and the work-rest cycles needed to prevent heat stress effects at the workplace. While there are more specific methods based on individual physiological measurements to determine heat strain in an individual worker, the WBGT index is used in international and national standards to specify workplace heat stress risks.

Calculating Workplace WBGT from Meteorological Data: A Tool for Climate Change Assessment

Authors: 
Lemke B, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2012

The WBGT heat stress index has been well tested under a variety of climatic conditions and quantitative links have been established between WBGT and the work-rest cycles needed to prevent heat stress effects at the workplace. While there are more specific methods based on indi-vidual physiological measurements to determine heat strain in an individual worker, the WBGT index is used in international and national standards to specify workplace heat stress risks.

Association Between Occupational Heat Stress and Kidney Disease Among 37 816 Workers in the Thai Cohort Study

Authors: 
Tawatsupa B, Lim LL-Y, Kjellstrom T, Seubsman S, Sleigh A & the Thai Cohort Study team
Year: 
2012

Background: We examined the relationship between self-reported occupational heat stress and incidence of self-reported doctor-diagnosed kidney disease in Thai workers.

Socio-cultural reflections on heat in Australia with implications for health and climate change adaptation

Authors: 
Banwell C, Dixon J, Bambrick H. Edwards F, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2012

Background : Australia has a hot climate with maximum summer temperatures in its major cities frequently exceeding 35°C. Although ‘heat waves’ are an annual occurrence, the associated heat-related deaths among vulnerable groups, such as older people, suggest that Australians could be better prepared to deal with extreme heat. Objective : To understand ways in which a vulnerable sub-population adapt their personal behaviour to cope with heat within the context of Australians’ relationship with heat.

Climate change, occupational health and workplace productivity.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2011

Climate change will increase the average global temperature, but there will be substantial variation in local regions. A variety of potential health impacts have been identified. One issue of emerging concern is high heat exposure in workplaces, both indoors and outdoors. This is already a major problem for people with physically demanding work in places with very hot seasons each year. Heat stress creates physiological change, clinical health effects and lowered work capacity, which for some people reduces their hourly productivity and income. The economic

Climate change, workplace heat exposure and occupational health in Central America.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Crowe J.
Year: 
2011

Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks.