Climate CHIP Publications

Climate change impacts on working people: how to develop prevention policies

Authors: 
Nilsson M, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

The evidence on negative consequences from climate change on human health and well-being is growing. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) described climate change as a threat to the climate system that sets the basis for life and human health conditions. The changing climate is expected to affect basic requirements needed to support and sustain human health such as good food, clean water, and unpolluted air, with negative effects that are expected to be unequally distributed.

The association between overall health, psychological stress and occupational heat stress among a large national cohort of 40,913 Thai workers.

Authors: 
Tawatsupa B, Lim L, Kjellstrom T, Seubsman S, Sleigh A, Thai Cohort Study Team
Year: 
2010

Occupational heat stress is a well-known problem, particularly in tropical countries, affecting workers, health and well-being. There are very few recent studies that have reported on the effect of heat stress on mental health, or overall health in workers, although socioeconomic development and rapid urbanization in tropical developing countries like Thailand create working conditions in which heat stress is likely. This study is aimed at identifying the relationship between self-reported heat stress and psychological distress, and overall health status in Thai workers.

The effects of extreme heat on human mortality and morbidity in Australia: implications for public health

Authors: 
Bi P, Williams S, Loughnan M, Lloyd G, Hansen A, Kjellstrom T, Dear KM, Saniotis A
Year: 
2010

Most regions of Australia are exposed to hot summers and regular extreme heat events; and numerous studies have associated high ambient temperatures with adverse health outcomes in Australian cities. Extreme environmental heat can trigger the onset of acute conditions, including heat stroke and dehydration, as well as exacerbate a range of underlying illnesses.

Regional maps of occupational heat exposure: past, present and potential future

Authors: 
Hyatt O, Lemke B, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

Background: An important feature of climate change is increasing human heat exposure in workplaces without cooling systems in tropical and subtropical countries. Detailed gridded heat exposure maps will provide essential information for public health authorities. Objectives: To develop and test methods for calculating occupational heat exposures and present results in easily interpreted maps.

Heat impact on school children in Cameroon, Africa: potential health threat from climate change

Authors: 
Dapi LN, Rocklov J, Nguefack-Tsague G, Tetanye E, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

Background: Health impacts related to climate change are potentially an increasing problem in Cameroon, especially during hot seasons when there are no means for protective and adaptive actions. Objective: To describe environmental conditions in schools and to evaluate the impact of heat on schoolchildren's health during school days in the Cameroon cities of Yaoundé and Douala. Methods: Schoolchildren (N=285) aged 12–16 years from public secondary schools completed a questionnaire about their background, general symptoms, and hot feelings in a cross-sectional study.

Climate change and health: impacts, vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Weaver HJ
Year: 
2009

Global climate change is progressing and health impacts have been observed in a number of countries, including Australia. The main health impacts will be due to direct heat exposure, extreme weather, air pollution, reduced local food production, food- and vectorborne infectious diseases and mental stress. The issue is one of major public health importance. Adaptation to reduce the effects of climate change involves many different sectors to minimise negative health outcomes. Wide-scale mitigation is also required, in order to reduce the effects of climate change.

Climate Change and Health -- impacts, vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Weaver HJ.
Year: 
2009

Global climate change is progressing and health impacts have been observed in a number of countries, including Australia. The main health impacts will be due to direct heat exposure, extreme weather, air pollution, reduced local food production, food- and vectorborne infectious diseases and mental stress. The issue is one of major public health importance. Adaptation to reduce the effects of climate change involves many different sectors to minimise negative health outcomes. Wide-scale mitigation is also required, in order to reduce the effects of climate change.

The 'Hothaps' programme for assessing climate change impacts on occupational health and productivity: an invitation to carry out field studies

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Gabrysch S, Lemke B, & Dear K
Year: 
2009

The ‘high occupational temperature health and productivity suppression’ programme (Hothaps) is a multicentre health research and prevention programme aimed at quantifying the extent to which working people are affected by, or adapt to, heat exposure while working, and how global heating during climate change may increase such effects. The programme will produce essential new evidence for local, national and global assessment of negative impacts of climate change that have largely been overlooked.