Climate CHIP Publications

Public health impact of global heating due to climate change – potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Butler A-J, Lucas R, Bonita R.
Year: 
2010

Objectives Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Method We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. Results

Climate change and mental health: a causal pathways framework

Authors: 
Berry HL, Bowen K, Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2010

Objectives Climate change will bring more frequent, long lasting and severe adverse weather events and these changes will affect mental health. We propose an explanatory framework to enhance consideration of how these effects may operate and to encourage debate about this important aspect of the health impacts of climate change. Methods Literature review. Results

Climate change impacts on working people: how to develop prevention policies

Authors: 
Nilsson M, Kjellstrom T.
Year: 
2010

The evidence on negative consequences from climate change on human health and well-being is growing. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) described climate change as a threat to the climate system that sets the basis for life and human health conditions. The changing climate is expected to affect basic requirements needed to support and sustain human health such as good food, clean water, and unpolluted air, with negative effects that are expected to be unequally distributed.

The association between overall health, psychological stress and occupational heat stress among a large national cohort of 40,913 Thai workers.

Authors: 
Tawatsupa B, Lim L, Kjellstrom T, Seubsman S, Sleigh A, Thai Cohort Study Team
Year: 
2010

Occupational heat stress is a well-known problem, particularly in tropical countries, affecting workers, health and well-being. There are very few recent studies that have reported on the effect of heat stress on mental health, or overall health in workers, although socioeconomic development and rapid urbanization in tropical developing countries like Thailand create working conditions in which heat stress is likely. This study is aimed at identifying the relationship between self-reported heat stress and psychological distress, and overall health status in Thai workers.

Book Chapter - Global situation concerning work-related injuries and diseases.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T and Hogstedt C In: Elgstrand K and Pettersson I. Eds.
Year: 
2009

the official picture Work related injuries and diseases come in many different forms and are often difficult to record, because other causal or risk factors than work are also involved. A worker injured by machinery inside a factory will clearly be classified as an occupational injury, but what if the worker was injured in a car crash driving between two worksites during working hours? It is likely that this will be classified as a traffic injury rather than as an occupational injury. Similarly, if an insulation worker who smokes develops lung cancer or

The “Hothaps” program for assessment of climate change impacts on occupational health and productivity: An invitation to carry out field studies

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T, Gabrysch S, Lemke B, Dear K
Year: 
2009

The “high occupational temperature health and productivity suppression” programme (Hothaps) is a multi-centre health research and prevention programme aimed at quantifying the extent to which working people are affected by, or adapt to, heat exposure while working, and how global heating during climate change may increase such effects. The programme will produce essential new evidence for local, national and global assessment of negative impacts of climate change that have largely been overlooked.

Book Chapter - Air pollution interacts with Climate Change – consequences for human health

Authors: 
Pershagen G, Kjellstrom T, Bellander T. (2009) . In: Pleijel H Ed.
Year: 
2009

Air pollution and climate change are often treated as if they were two separate problems, when they actually represent the same scourge. While the former has the most acute impact on human health, and causes economic harm to buildings, vegetation and activities such as tourism, the latter affects lives, property and the natural world in a less direct way, through weather disasters, windstroms, floods, droughts and rising sea levels.