Climate CHIP Publications

Climate change, heat exposure and labour productivity.

Authors: 
Kjellstrom T
Year: 
2000

“Too hot” working environments are not just a question of “comfort”, but a real concern for health protection and ability to perform work tasks. For un-acclimatized persons, already at temperatures above 22.5 degrees C the ability to perform at full capacity is reduced, and for acclimatized persons this reduction starts at 26 degrees C (WBGT). The reduction in work ability can be considered a form of “disability” that should be taken into account when assessing the “burden of disease or ill health” caused by global warming.

Daily mortality in relation to weather and air pollution in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Authors: 
Hales, S., Salmond, C., Town, I.C., Kjellstrom, T. and Woodward, A.
Year: 
2000

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the daily number of deaths, weather and ambient air pollution. METHOD: An ecological study. We assembled daily data for the city of Christchurch, New Zealand (population 300,000) from June 1988 to December 1993. We used Poisson regression models, controlling for season using a parametric method. RESULTS:

Chapter 3 - Energy, environment and health.

Authors: 
Holdren, J.P., Smith, K.R., Wang, X., Kjellstrom, T. et al.
Year: 
2000

In this chapter, the principal environmental and health impacts of energy are discussed according to the scale at which they occur. About half of the world’s households use solid fuels (biomass and coal) for cooking and heating in simple devices that produce large amounts of air pollution—pollution that is probably responsible for 4–5 percent of the global burden of disease. The chief ecosystem impacts relate to charcoal production and fuelwood harvesting. At the workplace scale, solid-fuel fuel cycles create significant risks for workers and have the largest impacts on populations among